Ethnic Conflict

New Research Sheds Light on Conflict Dynamics in South Sudan

Our new policy brief offers unique insight into the dynamics of interethnic conflict in South Sudan and strategic recommendations on how to support long-term stability in the country.

My Neighbor is My Brother – Helping Communities to Embrace Peace in Tanganyika

The Tanganyika and Haut-Katanga provinces, known for their rich deposits of copper and other metals, used to be a stable area of the DRC. In 2013, the region has plunged into conflict, pitting the tribes of the Luba and the Twa against each other; since then, relationships between […]

Reclaiming Identity: a Sri Lanka War Survivor’s Quest

To escape the horrors of war, Thanuja shed her identity. Now, she’s reclaiming it — and building a society that looks past ethnic differences.

Conflict Scan – Conflict Prevention and Management in North Katanga – Kalemie – November 2016

For the project “Prevention and Management of Conflict in the North Katanga”, Search for Common Ground, financed by the Fonds Social de la Republique, conducted its first round of Conflict Scans in five territories across two provinces in DRC, Tanganyika and the Haut Katanga provinces. This report focuses on Kalemie territory. These conflict scans conducted through interviews and focus groups aimed at providing a better understanding of the dynamics and roots of the current conflict and the actors involved in the destabilization of the local communities.

Occurring in a violent inter-ethnic conflict (Twas vs. Bantou and Baleaza, and Baleaza vs. Babemba) backdrop, participants to the conflict scans identified 2 major factors of division affecting sustainable development and social cohesion within local communities. The first factor was related to the power struggles and abuses of power which affects the succession of traditional community leaders, the control of economic resources (mines), tax collection and the livelihood of vulnerable women (the last two being specific to Mitwaba territory). The second factor of violent dissension was related to land issues, notably the issue of land title for returnee refugees and the destruction of lands by livestock farmers at the expense of crop farmers (Conflict scans Nyunzu, Kalemie, Manono and Pweto). Most conflicts result in kidnappings, murders, and SGBV. Given the lack of conflict resolution or transformation mechanisms, recommendations focused on the re-enforcement or creation of (traditional) peace committees and the implementation of forums of discussion which would involve belligerent ethnic groups, vulnerable youths, women miners to foster social dialogue. It is also recommended to have local governmental authorities as well as international and local NGOs involved in the various peace-related activities and to promote “Do no Harm” principles.

Conflict Scan – Conflict Prevention and Management in North Katanga – Pweto – November 2016

For the project “Prevention and Management of Conflict in the North Katanga”, Search for Common Ground, financed by the Fonds Social de la Republique, conducted its first round of Conflict Scans in five territories across two provinces in DRC, Tanganyika and the Haut Katanga provinces. This report focuses on Pweto territory. These conflict scans conducted through interviews and focus groups aimed at providing a better understanding of the dynamics and roots of the current conflict and the actors involved in the destabilization of the local communities.

Occurring in a violent inter-ethnic conflict (Twas vs. Bantou and Baleaza, and Baleaza vs. Babemba) backdrop, participants to the conflict scans identified 2 major factors of division affecting sustainable development and social cohesion within local communities. The first factor was related to the power struggles and abuses of power which affects the succession of traditional community leaders, the control of economic resources (mines), tax collection and the livelihood of vulnerable women (the last two being specific to Mitwaba territory). The second factor of violent dissension was related to land issues, notably the issue of land title for returnee refugees and the destruction of lands by livestock farmers at the expense of crop farmers (Conflict scans Nyunzu, Kalemie, Manono and Pweto). Most conflicts result in kidnappings, murders, and SGBV. Given the lack of conflict resolution or transformation mechanisms, recommendations focused on the re-enforcement or creation of (traditional) peace committees and the implementation of forums of discussion which would involve belligerent ethnic groups, vulnerable youths, women miners to foster social dialogue. It is also recommended to have local governmental authorities as well as international and local NGOs involved in the various peace-related activities and to promote “Do no Harm” principles.

Conflict Scan – Conflict Prevention and Management in North Katanga – Manono – November 2016

For the project “Prevention and Management of Conflict in the North Katanga”, Search for Common Ground, financed by the Fonds Social de la Republique, conducted its first round of Conflict Scans in five territories across two provinces in DRC, Tanganyika and the Haut Katanga provinces. This report focuses on Manono territory. These conflict scans conducted through interviews and focus groups aimed at providing a better understanding of the dynamics and roots of the current conflict and the actors involved in the destabilization of the local communities.

Occurring in a violent inter-ethnic conflict (Twas vs. Bantou and Baleaza, and Baleaza vs. Babemba) backdrop, participants to the conflict scans identified 2 major factors of division affecting sustainable development and social cohesion within local communities. The first factor was related to the power struggles and abuses of power which affects the succession of traditional community leaders, the control of economic resources (mines), tax collection and the livelihood of vulnerable women (the last two being specific to Mitwaba territory). The second factor of violent dissension was related to land issues, notably the issue of land title for returnee refugees and the destruction of lands by livestock farmers at the expense of crop farmers (Conflict scans Nyunzu, Kalemie, Manono and Pweto). Most conflicts result in kidnappings, murders, and SGBV. Given the lack of conflict resolution or transformation mechanisms, recommendations focused on the re-enforcement or creation of (traditional) peace committees and the implementation of forums of discussion which would involve belligerent ethnic groups, vulnerable youths, women miners to foster social dialogue. It is also recommended to have local governmental authorities as well as international and local NGOs involved in the various peace-related activities and to promote “Do no Harm” principles.

Conflict Scan – Conflict Prevention and Management in North Katanga – Nyunzu – November 2016

For the project “Prevention and Management of Conflict in the North Katanga”, Search for Common Ground, financed by the Fonds Social de la Republique, conducted its first round of Conflict Scans in five territories across two provinces in DRC, Tanganyika and the Haut Katanga provinces. This report focuses on Nyunzu territory. These conflict scans conducted through interviews and focus groups aimed at providing a better understanding of the dynamics and roots of the current conflict and the actors involved in the destabilization of the local communities.

Occurring in a violent inter-ethnic conflict (Twas vs. Bantou and Baleaza, and Baleaza vs. Babemba) backdrop, participants to the conflict scans identified 2 major factors of division affecting sustainable development and social cohesion within local communities. The first factor was related to the power struggles and abuses of power which affects the succession of traditional community leaders, the control of economic resources (mines), tax collection and the livelihood of vulnerable women (the last two being specific to Mitwaba territory). The second factor of violent dissension was related to land issues, notably the issue of land title for returnee refugees and the destruction of lands by livestock farmers at the expense of crop farmers (Conflict scans Nyunzu, Kalemie, Manono and Pweto). Most conflicts result in kidnappings, murders, and SGBV. Given the lack of conflict resolution or transformation mechanisms, recommendations focused on the re-enforcement or creation of (traditional) peace committees and the implementation of forums of discussion which would involve belligerent ethnic groups, vulnerable youths, women miners to foster social dialogue. It is also recommended to have local governmental authorities as well as international and local NGOs involved in the various peace-related activities and to promote “Do no Harm” principles.