Toolkits

Faith Matters: a Guide for the Design, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Inter-religious Action For Peacebuilding

This Guide is intended to improve the practice of inter-religious action for peace, by encouraging the regular application of monitoring and evaluation tools. We assume that when practitioners of inter-religious peacebuilding use monitoring and evaluation processes for learning, improvements in effectiveness will follow. There is a large and expanding body of guidance for monitoring and evaluation in many realms. However, there has not been a guide specifically oriented to the needs of those engaging religious actors. This Guide seeks to fill that gap.

Accommodating Religious Identity in Youth Peacebuilding Programs

This toolkit presents an overview of how our programs engage, respect, and accommodate young people’s religious identities around the world, based on insights from Search for Common Ground staff and evaluations. The toolkit identifies positive outcomes and challenges from case studies in the field, examining the different types of programming engaging young people and their religious identities (inter-, intra-, and non-religious programming). A section with recommendations for incorporating gender sensitivities in religious peacebuilding follows, and the toolkits concludes with a review of practical religious considerations for designing and implementing programs. At the end of the toolkit, two appendices provide additional guidance on religious sensitivity in the program cycle and relevant resources for further reading.

We hope that sharing insights from programs in different locations and contexts will contribute to the efforts of Search and other peace practitioners to continuously improve practice in this area.

Youth-led Research Guidance Note

Youth-led research is a powerful tool for youth empowerment and engagement, and for inquiry contributing to improved understanding of community issues. At Search for Common Ground, we have pioneered projects which put the power of research, design, and advocacy in the hands of young people.

This guidance note presents some of the lessons learned by youth-led research projects in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Burundi, and Tanzania. The intention of this document is to assist practitioners in recognizing the multiple values of youth-led research as a program approach and to identify key considerations to help guide the design and implementation of new projects.

Resources:

Transforming Violent Extremism: A Peacebuilder’s Guide

Drawing from decades of experience on the ground, this guide offers guiding principles for peacebuilders and practitioners working to transform violent extremism around the world.

Youth Radio for Peacebuilding – A Guide (2nd Edition)

by Michael Shipler This is a guidebook, not a workshop or conference report. It has been written for radio broadcasters (adults and youth) who want to make good, entertaining youth radio programmes which also build peace. The tools described here are meant for use by those working in […]

Monitoring and Evaluation of Participatory Theatre for Change

This module contributes to learning around Participatory Theatre for Change (PTC) by outlining specific considerations for utilizing relevant aspects of design and incorporating M&E from the beginning of the PTC process. It offers practical guidance and tool suggestions for implementing monitoring and evaluation in PTC programs, or programs that involve PTC as one activity. The Module also highlights considerations and approaches for process and quality monitoring of PTC programs and practitioners.

Practice Note 1: Memorialisation and Reconciliation in Sri Lanka

This series of practice notes, as part of the Community Memorialisation Project, is meant to provide an overview of memorialisation as a tool for reconciliation and transitional justice in post-conflict contexts, using the Sri Lankan experience as an example. The findings from individual and community memorialisation will provide grass roots level access to a range of issues and considerations that may have, or may in future, cause and trigger violence. These need to be addressed in a comprehensive way in the context of justice, psycho-social healing, reparations, reconciliation, race relations, rehabilitation, gender issues, security issues among others. This series by various practitioners, is meant for researchers, cultural activists, practitioners and policy makers in order to better understand key tools and opportunities for using memorialisation in post-conflict contexts, guidelines and principles on how memorialisation and its use in reconciliation can be practiced and draw on existing good practice for planning and programming in this area.