Africa

Standing Together for Democracy Consortium: Background and Purpose

The ‘Standing Together for Democracy Consortium’ is a coalition of seven organisations: five Sierra Leonean – the National Election Watch (NEW), Campaign for Good Governance (CGG), the Independent Radio Network (IRN), the Institute for Governance Reform (IGR) IGR, 50/50 Group (50/50) – and two international organisations – Westminster Foundation for Democracy and Search for Common Ground. The coalition is led by Search for Common Ground (SFCG).

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Title: “Promotion of Key Family Practices” Final Evaluation – Madagascar – February 2017

Search for Common Ground implemented the project “Promoting Key Family Practices through Regional Communication Strategies for Child Survival, Development, Education and Protection” between August 2014 and March 2016, funded by UNICEF and UNFPA, in Analanjirofo, Anosy and Atsimo Andrefana regions of Madagascar. The project was part of the development of national communication plans aiming at promoting behavior changes in favor of children’s rights.

This final evaluation report outlines the main results of the project. Training participants increased their knowledge in communicating on the Key Family Practices. The local radios and community organizations were efficient in terms of broadcasting the different programs and more than 60 000 people were also reached through community events. Overall, 87% of the population interviewed had listened to at least one SFCG “product”. The report presents visible effects: in the education sector, the findings show that 89% of the population who listened to the messages adopted and practiced “sending children to school who were between the ages of 6 and 11 years old”. Protection aspects were also well received, as 84% adopted immediate actions to behave non-violently towards children, and 96% rejected early marriage for children younger than 18 years old. In terms of sustainability, the project allowed for the development of collaboration mechanisms between WASH, health and education sectors and the media, which will last after the end of the implementation. One of the main recommendations is to increase capacity building activities and promote skills transfer from SFCG to national official or non-governmental actors; this is now being carried out by SFCG in the framework of a new UNICEF project.

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Pre-intervention Conflict Scan – Alternative Responses for Community in Crisis – DRC – February 2017

Search for Common Ground conducted a conflict scan in Kalemie territory in February 2017 to provide a better understanding of the conflictual and social context to partners AVSI/UNICEF prior to the implementation of their project “Alternative Responses for Community in Crisis”. This scan was carried through a combined qualitative and quantitative approach using surveys, focus groups, and key interviews.

Local communities in Kalemie cited three major and recurrent conflicts with violent consequences. 43% of participants identified land conflicts between farmers (crop farmers vs. livestock farmers), fueled by corrupt land authorities, as the main conflict affecting the region. The second conflict identified by 42% of interviewees was related to the power struggle stemming from the longstanding inter-ethnic conflict between the Twas and the Bantus in Tanganyika Province. The real roots of this conflict are unknown to the community members; however, they cited that it is exacerbated by NGOs affiliated with certain ethnic groups inciting violence. Although identified by only 5% of participants, the third type of conflict is extremely important for Do No Harm strategizing in the region. Participants cited humanitarian interventions, and the lack of context and conflict analysis of international humanitarian agencies. According to local populations, the lack of understanding of the context and the lack of monitoring and sustainability of projects by past agencies has deepened the discord within communities and IDPs. Therefore, they advise AVSI and others to be inclusive and knowledgeable of all the beneficiaries of projects to avoid further conflicts.

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Conflict Scan – Conflict Prevention and Management in North Katanga – Kalemie – November 2016

For the project “Prevention and Management of Conflict in the North Katanga”, Search for Common Ground, financed by the Fonds Social de la Republique, conducted its first round of Conflict Scans in five territories across two provinces in DRC, Tanganyika and the Haut Katanga provinces. This report focuses on Kalemie territory. These conflict scans conducted through interviews and focus groups aimed at providing a better understanding of the dynamics and roots of the current conflict and the actors involved in the destabilization of the local communities.

Occurring in a violent inter-ethnic conflict (Twas vs. Bantou and Baleaza, and Baleaza vs. Babemba) backdrop, participants to the conflict scans identified 2 major factors of division affecting sustainable development and social cohesion within local communities. The first factor was related to the power struggles and abuses of power which affects the succession of traditional community leaders, the control of economic resources (mines), tax collection and the livelihood of vulnerable women (the last two being specific to Mitwaba territory). The second factor of violent dissension was related to land issues, notably the issue of land title for returnee refugees and the destruction of lands by livestock farmers at the expense of crop farmers (Conflict scans Nyunzu, Kalemie, Manono and Pweto). Most conflicts result in kidnappings, murders, and SGBV. Given the lack of conflict resolution or transformation mechanisms, recommendations focused on the re-enforcement or creation of (traditional) peace committees and the implementation of forums of discussion which would involve belligerent ethnic groups, vulnerable youths, women miners to foster social dialogue. It is also recommended to have local governmental authorities as well as international and local NGOs involved in the various peace-related activities and to promote “Do no Harm” principles.

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Conflict Scan – Conflict Prevention and Management in North Katanga – Pweto – November 2016

For the project “Prevention and Management of Conflict in the North Katanga”, Search for Common Ground, financed by the Fonds Social de la Republique, conducted its first round of Conflict Scans in five territories across two provinces in DRC, Tanganyika and the Haut Katanga provinces. This report focuses on Pweto territory. These conflict scans conducted through interviews and focus groups aimed at providing a better understanding of the dynamics and roots of the current conflict and the actors involved in the destabilization of the local communities.

Occurring in a violent inter-ethnic conflict (Twas vs. Bantou and Baleaza, and Baleaza vs. Babemba) backdrop, participants to the conflict scans identified 2 major factors of division affecting sustainable development and social cohesion within local communities. The first factor was related to the power struggles and abuses of power which affects the succession of traditional community leaders, the control of economic resources (mines), tax collection and the livelihood of vulnerable women (the last two being specific to Mitwaba territory). The second factor of violent dissension was related to land issues, notably the issue of land title for returnee refugees and the destruction of lands by livestock farmers at the expense of crop farmers (Conflict scans Nyunzu, Kalemie, Manono and Pweto). Most conflicts result in kidnappings, murders, and SGBV. Given the lack of conflict resolution or transformation mechanisms, recommendations focused on the re-enforcement or creation of (traditional) peace committees and the implementation of forums of discussion which would involve belligerent ethnic groups, vulnerable youths, women miners to foster social dialogue. It is also recommended to have local governmental authorities as well as international and local NGOs involved in the various peace-related activities and to promote “Do no Harm” principles.

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Conflict Scan – Conflict Prevention and Management in North Katanga – Manono – November 2016

For the project “Prevention and Management of Conflict in the North Katanga”, Search for Common Ground, financed by the Fonds Social de la Republique, conducted its first round of Conflict Scans in five territories across two provinces in DRC, Tanganyika and the Haut Katanga provinces. This report focuses on Manono territory. These conflict scans conducted through interviews and focus groups aimed at providing a better understanding of the dynamics and roots of the current conflict and the actors involved in the destabilization of the local communities.

Occurring in a violent inter-ethnic conflict (Twas vs. Bantou and Baleaza, and Baleaza vs. Babemba) backdrop, participants to the conflict scans identified 2 major factors of division affecting sustainable development and social cohesion within local communities. The first factor was related to the power struggles and abuses of power which affects the succession of traditional community leaders, the control of economic resources (mines), tax collection and the livelihood of vulnerable women (the last two being specific to Mitwaba territory). The second factor of violent dissension was related to land issues, notably the issue of land title for returnee refugees and the destruction of lands by livestock farmers at the expense of crop farmers (Conflict scans Nyunzu, Kalemie, Manono and Pweto). Most conflicts result in kidnappings, murders, and SGBV. Given the lack of conflict resolution or transformation mechanisms, recommendations focused on the re-enforcement or creation of (traditional) peace committees and the implementation of forums of discussion which would involve belligerent ethnic groups, vulnerable youths, women miners to foster social dialogue. It is also recommended to have local governmental authorities as well as international and local NGOs involved in the various peace-related activities and to promote “Do no Harm” principles.

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Conflict Scan – Conflict Prevention and Management in North Katanga – Nyunzu – November 2016

For the project “Prevention and Management of Conflict in the North Katanga”, Search for Common Ground, financed by the Fonds Social de la Republique, conducted its first round of Conflict Scans in five territories across two provinces in DRC, Tanganyika and the Haut Katanga provinces. This report focuses on Nyunzu territory. These conflict scans conducted through interviews and focus groups aimed at providing a better understanding of the dynamics and roots of the current conflict and the actors involved in the destabilization of the local communities.

Occurring in a violent inter-ethnic conflict (Twas vs. Bantou and Baleaza, and Baleaza vs. Babemba) backdrop, participants to the conflict scans identified 2 major factors of division affecting sustainable development and social cohesion within local communities. The first factor was related to the power struggles and abuses of power which affects the succession of traditional community leaders, the control of economic resources (mines), tax collection and the livelihood of vulnerable women (the last two being specific to Mitwaba territory). The second factor of violent dissension was related to land issues, notably the issue of land title for returnee refugees and the destruction of lands by livestock farmers at the expense of crop farmers (Conflict scans Nyunzu, Kalemie, Manono and Pweto). Most conflicts result in kidnappings, murders, and SGBV. Given the lack of conflict resolution or transformation mechanisms, recommendations focused on the re-enforcement or creation of (traditional) peace committees and the implementation of forums of discussion which would involve belligerent ethnic groups, vulnerable youths, women miners to foster social dialogue. It is also recommended to have local governmental authorities as well as international and local NGOs involved in the various peace-related activities and to promote “Do no Harm” principles.